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Cellular import and export of free and protein-...
59,00 € *
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Cellular import and export of free and protein-bound vitamin B12 ab 59 EURO A medical book

Anbieter: ebook.de
Stand: 28.05.2020
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Cellular import and export of free and protein-...
59,00 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

This book is based on experimental work performed at Aarhus University. The work was conducted to gain insight into the cellular endocytosis and export of vitamin B12. Vitamin B12 (cobalamin) is an organic molecule which functions as an essential coenzyme for two metabolic reactions in mammalians. Cellular vitamin B12 uptake is a complex process involving different binding proteins and receptors. The studies revealed that the endocytosis of transcobalamin bound to fluorescent vitamin B12 conjugate is correlated with cell growth in fast dividing cancer cells and the uptake of free vitamin B12 was negliable at low as well as high cell division activity. Furthermore this study provides evidenced that vitamin B12 is exported to the cellular environment as a free molecule and the binding to a carrier protein occur subsequently to export, and a novel transporter for the cellular export of vitamin B12 was identified. In conclusion, this PhD study provides new information on the cellular vitamin B12 import and in particular export by revealed a novel transport mechanism of non-protein bound vitamin B12 and the identification of a transporter protein for this process.

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 28.05.2020
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Nuclear Export of Viral RNAs
117,00 CHF *
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In eukaryotic cells, the nuclear genome and its transcriptional apparatus is separated from the site of protein synthesis by the nuclear envelope. Thus, a constant flow of proteins and nucleic acids has to cross the nuclear envelope in both directions. This transport in and out of the nucleus is mediated by nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) and occurs in an energy and signal-dependent manner. Thus, nucleocytoplasmic translocation of macro molecules across the nuclear envelope appears to be a highly specific and regulated process. Viruses that replicate their genome in the cell nucleus are therefore forced to develop efficient ways to deal with the intracellulZlr host cell transport machinery. Historically, investigation of Polyomavirus replication allowed identification ofsequences that mediate nuclear import, which led subsequently to our detailed understanding of the cellular factors that are involved in nuclear import. Transport ofmacromolecules in the opposite direction, however, is less well understood. The investigation of retroviral gene expression in recent years pro vided the first insights into the cellular mechanisms that regulate nuclear export. In particular, the detailed dissection of the function of the human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-I) Rev trans-activator protein identified CRMI, as a hona fide nuclear export receptor. CRM I appears to be involved in the nucleocytoplasmic translocation of the vast majority of viral and cellular proteins that have subsequently been found to contain a Rev-type leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES).

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 28.05.2020
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Nuclear Export of Viral RNAs
98,99 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

In eukaryotic cells, the nuclear genome and its transcriptional apparatus is separated from the site of protein synthesis by the nuclear envelope. Thus, a constant flow of proteins and nucleic acids has to cross the nuclear envelope in both directions. This transport in and out of the nucleus is mediated by nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) and occurs in an energy and signal-dependent manner. Thus, nucleocytoplasmic translocation of macro molecules across the nuclear envelope appears to be a highly specific and regulated process. Viruses that replicate their genome in the cell nucleus are therefore forced to develop efficient ways to deal with the intracellulZlr host cell transport machinery. Historically, investigation of Polyomavirus replication allowed identification ofsequences that mediate nuclear import, which led subsequently to our detailed understanding of the cellular factors that are involved in nuclear import. Transport ofmacromolecules in the opposite direction, however, is less well understood. The investigation of retroviral gene expression in recent years pro vided the first insights into the cellular mechanisms that regulate nuclear export. In particular, the detailed dissection of the function of the human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-I) Rev trans-activator protein identified CRMI, as a hona fide nuclear export receptor. CRM I appears to be involved in the nucleocytoplasmic translocation of the vast majority of viral and cellular proteins that have subsequently been found to contain a Rev-type leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES).

Anbieter: Thalia AT
Stand: 28.05.2020
Zum Angebot